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Money for Life work in partnership with the Money Advice Service, an independent organisation set up by government. Money AdviceService provides free, unbiased money guidance across the UK to help people make the most of their money.  If you have a question or need help, you can chat to them here.

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Three books that will reset and reshape your relationship with money

By Alice Merry

Over the summer, several thought-provoking money advice books have been published such as You’re Not Broke You’re Pre-Rich by Emilie Bellet or Money Lessons by Lisa Conway-Hughes. They have grabbed our attention on our quest to find the best financial education and money management advice for young people. One of our regular guest writers, Alice Merry has taken it upon herself to check out these new money management books over the summer and share the most helpful advice she gained from them with Money for Life.

You’re not broke, you’re pre-rich,” according to Emilie Bellet’s book, which promises to help you have more control over your money (and get more of it).

If you want to really understand what’s going on behind your bank balance and what you can do about it, this book needs to be at the top of your reading list. Emilie’s approach helps you take a frank look at your finances – debts, poor spending habits and all – and start addressing them today. She takes you through practical tools to understand where you stand financially and how your beliefs about money are affecting the way you manage it.

From there, the book takes you through a process of setting money goals and lays out straightforward and friendly advice for achieving them – from getting debt-free to making your first investment.

Whatever your money goals, these are efforts we shouldn’t be taking on alone, according to Alex Holder’s new book Open Up: Why Talking About Money Will Change Your Life.

Would you be willing to share with friends and colleagues how much you earn? Alex thinks we should be sharing this and much more. In chapter two she leads by example and puts a number on the advance she received for writing the book.

Open Up argues that on a personal level, taboos about money are trapping us in shame, confusion, and bad habits. And, as a country, more transparency could be part of the answer to tackling pay inequality across gender, age, and race. Alex’s book is an invitation to have a more honest conversation about money in our relationships, with friends and at work.

The long-term impact of learning to talk about, plan and manage your money is life-changing according to Money Lessons, Lisa Conway-Hughes’ guide to money management.

Lisa knows that when it comes to money, most of us are scared, stressed and busy burying our heads in the sand. Her book encourages you to step back, map out the future you want, and understand how your finances can help you get there.

The book sets out a challenge: “If you spent an hour a month nurturing your finances for the next twelve months, how would you feel this time next year?”

Why not pick up any of these three books and set aside half an hour today to get started on resetting your own relationship with money.

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Money for Life work in partnership with the Money Advice Service, an independent organisation set up by government. Money AdviceService provides free, unbiased money guidance across the UK to help people make the most of their money.  If you have a question or need help, you can chat to them here.

Launch Chat

Chat to the Money Advice Service
Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm
Saturday, 9am to 1pm.