Chat

Chat

Money for Life work in partnership with the Money Advice Service, an independent organisation set up by government. Money AdviceService provides free, unbiased money guidance across the UK to help people make the most of their money.  If you have a question or need help, you can chat to them here.

Launch Chat

Chat to the Money Advice Service
Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm
Saturday, 9am to 1pm.

 

5 affordable ways to practise self-care

By Rebecca Hastings

 

Mood as low as your bank balance? Self-care isn’t all about shopping sprees or expensive face masks – a lot of the time, it means just doing the basics to keep your wellbeing in check and help you feel a little brighter. Self-care is for everyone – it doesn’t matter how much money you’ve got. Here are a few ways for you to take care of yourself without splashing out…

 

Take a day off from social media

We’re not saying it’s all bad. Social media can be great for our mental health – it allows us to keep in touch with friends, stay informed and, most importantly, look at pictures of excellent dogs. But sometimes, it can feel as though there’s just too much distressing news, or too much pressure to be funny or interesting online.

So, if you’ve found yourself feeling this way, here’s a challenge: see if you can go 24 hours without opening any social media apps. If you feel better, you might want to try it for longer. 

 

Cook something new

Cooking a meal or baking something for yourself, especially using a recipe you’ve never tried before, can be a great way to take your mind off whatever is worrying you, as you’re forced to focus entirely on the task at hand. It doesn’t have to be anything fancy – the BBC Good Food website has a great section on budget recipes, which require very few ingredients, or use staples that you might already have in your kitchen.

 

Call or text a friend

You don’t even have to chat about how you’re feeling – though it usually does help to talk through any problems you might be experiencing. Just hearing a friend’s voice or seeing a text message from someone you love can lift you out of a bad mood. 

Sometimes, if you’re feeling low, you might feel at a loss as to how to initiate a conversation, even with a close friend – a good way to start is to send them a picture, meme or news story you think they’ll find funny or interesting.

 

Read something on paper

When you feel tired of looking at a screen, reading something in print can be a great way to unwind, so consider working your way through that to-read pile on your bedside table. If you feel as though you might struggle to focus on a book at the moment, you could treat yourself to a print magazine or have a flick through a newspaper supplement instead.

 

Get outside

This doesn’t necessarily mean you need to exercise – sometimes it can be difficult to motivate yourself to get active when you’re feeling sad or worried – but simply spending time outdoors can really help. According to the charity Mind, spending time in nature can have positive effects on our mental wellbeing. So, plug your headphones in and take a short walk, or find somewhere to sit in the sun, relax and feel that endorphin rush – all without spending a single penny. Result.

@rebz_hastings

 

Worried about money? Click here for advice on what to do if money is affecting your mental health. 

Chat

Money for Life work in partnership with the Money Advice Service, an independent organisation set up by government. Money AdviceService provides free, unbiased money guidance across the UK to help people make the most of their money.  If you have a question or need help, you can chat to them here.

Launch Chat

Chat to the Money Advice Service
Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm
Saturday, 9am to 1pm.